The Red Brick Art Museum is a hidden gem in the outskirts of Beijing. Located a few kilometers west of the Capital Airport, the museum is definitely off the beaten path. As sculptural and articulated as they are, its tall perimeter walls opposite of shanty shops across the street, do not immediately call to mind the presence of a sophisticated cultural institution. But once through the moon gate and inside the museum compound, it is clear that this is about pure celebration of masonry architecture and garden making. Shooting the various indoor and outdoor spaces of the museum, it's hard for me not to marvel at the architect Dong Yugan's ability to create richness and drama in seemingly minute and confined areas. It's as if every time a shot is composed inside the picture frame, three more are waiting to be discovered just outside of it. Evidently, many ideas of traditional Chinese gardens have inspired the various levels within a single floor and the tightening and releasing of spaces experienced in a sequence. But its singular use of masonry as the material throughout creates a cohesion and simplicity that is rather modern and bold. The museum draws a mixed crowd from all walks of life. With spaces so infinite and textures so stimulating, small children, teenagers, adults and senior citizens all seem to enjoy their own moments of hide and seek, romantic stroll, or zen like respite.
       
     
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 The Red Brick Art Museum is a hidden gem in the outskirts of Beijing. Located a few kilometers west of the Capital Airport, the museum is definitely off the beaten path. As sculptural and articulated as they are, its tall perimeter walls opposite of shanty shops across the street, do not immediately call to mind the presence of a sophisticated cultural institution. But once through the moon gate and inside the museum compound, it is clear that this is about pure celebration of masonry architecture and garden making. Shooting the various indoor and outdoor spaces of the museum, it's hard for me not to marvel at the architect Dong Yugan's ability to create richness and drama in seemingly minute and confined areas. It's as if every time a shot is composed inside the picture frame, three more are waiting to be discovered just outside of it. Evidently, many ideas of traditional Chinese gardens have inspired the various levels within a single floor and the tightening and releasing of spaces experienced in a sequence. But its singular use of masonry as the material throughout creates a cohesion and simplicity that is rather modern and bold. The museum draws a mixed crowd from all walks of life. With spaces so infinite and textures so stimulating, small children, teenagers, adults and senior citizens all seem to enjoy their own moments of hide and seek, romantic stroll, or zen like respite.
       
     

The Red Brick Art Museum is a hidden gem in the outskirts of Beijing. Located a few kilometers west of the Capital Airport, the museum is definitely off the beaten path. As sculptural and articulated as they are, its tall perimeter walls opposite of shanty shops across the street, do not immediately call to mind the presence of a sophisticated cultural institution. But once through the moon gate and inside the museum compound, it is clear that this is about pure celebration of masonry architecture and garden making. Shooting the various indoor and outdoor spaces of the museum, it's hard for me not to marvel at the architect Dong Yugan's ability to create richness and drama in seemingly minute and confined areas. It's as if every time a shot is composed inside the picture frame, three more are waiting to be discovered just outside of it. Evidently, many ideas of traditional Chinese gardens have inspired the various levels within a single floor and the tightening and releasing of spaces experienced in a sequence. But its singular use of masonry as the material throughout creates a cohesion and simplicity that is rather modern and bold. The museum draws a mixed crowd from all walks of life. With spaces so infinite and textures so stimulating, small children, teenagers, adults and senior citizens all seem to enjoy their own moments of hide and seek, romantic stroll, or zen like respite.

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